Catégorie : History

The US Opium Wars: China, Burma and the CIA

The exiled Kuomintang (KMT) army of Li Mi was as much a proprietary of the Central Intelligence Agency as Civil Air Transport. Installed in Burma, this army was armed by the CIA, fed by the CIA, and paid by the CIA. In later operations in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam the CIA used it as a labor pool. Under this patronage and protection the KMT was able to build up its opium operations in the area of Southeast Asia known as the Golden Triangle.

Blood and Oil: The Middle East in World War I

Anyone interested in learning and understanding the timeline of events that has lead us to the modern day conflict in the Middle East, should watch this film created by Marty Callaghan. ‘Blood and Oil’ is a detailed account about the motivation behind the birth of the Middle Eastern nations and the insatiable greed for oil.

Rape, soldiers, WW2, USSR, Wehrmacht, World War 2,

Rapewhistling for Hitler

Contrary to the myth of the “clean Wehrmacht” spread by retired Nazi generals and their wehraboo admirers after the war, there was plenty of rape amongst German soldiers in the USSR.

The European Union always was a CIA project, as Brexiteers discover

One of these masterful journalistic pieces one keeps for reference. Published in April 2016. – « As this newspaper first reported when the treasure became available, one memorandum dated July 26, 1950, reveals a campaign to promote a full-fledged European parliament. It is signed by Gen William J Donovan, head of the American wartime Office of Strategic Services, precursor of the Central Inteligence Agency. »

Why World War II ended with Mushroom Clouds

« In the European Theatre, World War II ended in early May 1945 with the capitulation of Nazi Germany. The “Big Three” on the side of the victors – Great Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union – now faced the complex problem of the postwar reorganization of Europe. The United States had entered the war rather late, in December 1941, and had only started to make a truly significant military contribution to the Allied victory over Germany with the landings in Normandy in June 1944, less than one year before the end of the hostilities. When the war against Germany ended, however, Washington sat firmly and confidently at the table of the victors, determined to achieve what might be called its “war aims.”