Étiqueté : WW2

neoliberal

EU Uber Alles? Neoliberal Echoes Of A Darker, Mid-Century Plan For Continental Unity

The unflinching support for the EU and its institutions is not about preventing European countries from becoming “Afghanistan.” Not about preventing collapse. Not about the inconvenience of long lines at passport control. It is about promoting an ideology, a specific worldview, a vision for the way the world should work.

Reuters (finally) realizes there are Nazis in Ukraine

In the Atlantic, in 2014, Ukrainian Nazis were dismissed as a “phantom menace”. Luke Harding wrote a (brilliantly argued) column in the Guardian saying that “there weren’t any Nazis in Ukraine because one of the Maidan protesters was Jewish.” Politico magazine mocked “Putin’s Imaginary Nazis”, whilst US News warned against Russia’s “Neo-Nazi Propaganda”. The Guardian simply headlined: “Don’t believe the Russian propaganda about Ukraine’s ‘fascist’ protesters!” There never were Nazis in Ukraine.
Except now there are.

Rape, soldiers, WW2, USSR, Wehrmacht, World War 2,

Rapewhistling for Hitler

Contrary to the myth of the “clean Wehrmacht” spread by retired Nazi generals and their wehraboo admirers after the war, there was plenty of rape amongst German soldiers in the USSR.

The European Union always was a CIA project, as Brexiteers discover

One of these masterful journalistic pieces one keeps for reference. Published in April 2016. – « As this newspaper first reported when the treasure became available, one memorandum dated July 26, 1950, reveals a campaign to promote a full-fledged European parliament. It is signed by Gen William J Donovan, head of the American wartime Office of Strategic Services, precursor of the Central Inteligence Agency. »

Why World War II ended with Mushroom Clouds

« In the European Theatre, World War II ended in early May 1945 with the capitulation of Nazi Germany. The “Big Three” on the side of the victors – Great Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union – now faced the complex problem of the postwar reorganization of Europe. The United States had entered the war rather late, in December 1941, and had only started to make a truly significant military contribution to the Allied victory over Germany with the landings in Normandy in June 1944, less than one year before the end of the hostilities. When the war against Germany ended, however, Washington sat firmly and confidently at the table of the victors, determined to achieve what might be called its “war aims.”

The Bomb Didn’t Beat Japan … Stalin Did

« When the story of Hiroshima is told in most American histories, the day of the bombing — Aug. 6 — serves as the narrative climax. All the elements of the story point forward to that moment: the decision to build a bomb, the secret research at Los Alamos, the first impressive test, and the final culmination at Hiroshima. It is told, in other words, as a story about the Bomb. But you can’t analyze Japan’s decision to surrender objectively in the context of the story of the Bomb. Casting it as “the story of the Bomb” already presumes that the Bomb’s role is central. »

Japon, Samouraïs, Bushido, Voie du guerrier, fascisme, Deuxième Guerre mondiale, nazisme, Mishima, seppuku, Hara-kiri, ronin, Meiji,

Bushido : Way of Total Bullshit

« Though initially rejected in Japan, Nitobe’s ideology – the 20th century construct called bushido – would be embraced by a government driven war machine. Thanks to its empowering vision of the past, the extreme nationalist movement embraced bushido, exploiting Nitobe’s book, ‘The Soul of Japan’ to pave Japan’s way to fascism in the buildup to World War II. »

Euro-federalists financed by US spy chiefs

« DECLASSIFIED American government documents show that the US intelligence community ran a campaign in the Fifties and Sixties to build momentum for a united Europe. It funded and directed the European federalist movement. »

Why America Needs War

By Jacques R. Pauwels, historian, political scientist, author of The Myth of the Good War: America in the Second World War (James Lorimer, Toronto, 2002). Together with personalities like Ramsey Clark, Michael Parenti, William Blum, Robert Weil, Michel Collon, Peter Franssen and many others, he signed “The International Appeal against US-War”.